A sand-covered railway track in the Namibia Desert

Doro Nawas, the Perfect Break

Doro Nawas Camp, offers an authentic approach to hospitality and activities.

Driving through a valley of volcanic rocks layered on a bed of sand with varying colours – it struck me just how remote we actually were. I stopped the car to take a photo, and walking outside, there was just the wind, the sun and me – and my family in the car; commenting that I was taking yet another picture, but I couldn’t help it.

The last town before you hit Doro Nawas is a place called Uis. Here, tables of brightly coloured semi-precious jewels and stones are displayed and on sale, providing essential income to the local townspeople. It is pretty incredible that such exquisitely coloured rocks are found in such barren landscapes – and is an apt description of Namibia as a whole. Doro Nawas is represented in a similar way, boldly sitting atop a hill overlooking the Abu-Huab river. Washed in darker colours, she unobtrusively offers beautiful vistas along with spacious areas and rooms to relax in. The darker walls are juxtaposed with lighter furnishings and décor. However, these aren’t the main focus, as is the case in so many other camps – the star here is the view. These views are available from all areas of the main area – whether from the lounge and wrap-around decks divided by high framed glass-fronted wooden doors; or from the large open-air rooftop. It is truly remarkable to watch the sunrise over the not so distant hills whilst enjoying coffee in the early morning.

Family at Dora Nawas watching the sunrise

Doro Nawas is a Wilderness Safaris Adventure Camp and offers an authentic approach to hospitality and activities. Here we were treated to truly warm hospitality, which translated into a more personal interaction amongst all the guests that were staying due to the overall ambience of the camp. Food was freshly prepared, and although it didn’t offer a large number of choices, it was delicious and generously portioned. Our children loved being allowed to make some of their own food, and even presented us with Jelly, which they had made with managers and chefs.

Activities generally required a fair amount of driving, so we were grateful for the closed-in and air-conditioned vehicles that had lovely soft suspension for the rocky terrain. The main attraction, without a doubt, is both seeing and learning about the Desert adapted elephants. Watching these ancient Pachyderms in an arid environment not generally suited to their species is quite awe-inspiring. Throw in a couple of amazing dunes, and it makes for fantastic imagery. There are also trips out to the rock engravings, living museums and the fossilised forests, which are all interesting and certainly allow for some memorable experiences.

We were meant to stay for two nights, which is the ideal duration – however, we added on an extra night, which allowed us to relax a lot more. 

All in all – a memorable stay in many ways, and we thoroughly enjoyed ourselves. 

Do be warned, though – the path up to the main area from the rooms is steep; pack your walking shoes!

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“If I have ever seen magic, it has been in Africa.”

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